Hip Pain is treated by injecting Steroids (short for corticosteroids) a synthetic drug that closely resembles cortisol, a hormone that your adrenal glands produce naturally. Corticosteroids are different from the male hormone-related steroid compounds that some athletes use.

Steroids work by decreasing inflammation and reducing the activity of the immune system. Steroids are used to treat a variety of inflammatory diseases and conditions.

Hip Pain Related to Arthritis

 

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How Are Steroids Given?

Steroid drugs are available in several forms that vary in how easily they dissolve or how long they stay in the body.

Steroids may be given systemically, which means throughout the “system” or body, or locally to the precise place where a problem exists.

Systemic steroids can be given either through a vein (intravenously, or IV), into a muscle (intramuscularly), or by mouth (orally). Local steroids can be given as eye drops, ear drops, and skin creams, or by direct injection into joints, bursae (lubricating sacs between certain tendons and the bones beneath them), or around tendons and other soft tissue areas.

Why Are Steroids Injected into the Hip?

Injecting steroids into one or two local areas of inflammation allows doctors to deliver a high dose of medication directly to the problem area. When doctors give steroids by mouth or intravenously, they cannot be sure an adequate amount of the steroid will eventually reach the problem area.

 

 

 

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